Since the first HVAC system was introduced many years ago, homeowners in Homewood, Alabama, and around the world have appreciated the comfort and convenience that this system brings to their homes. Today’s units are quite different from the units of old, and HVAC technology continues to get better. Check out these fascinating innovations in the HVAC industry to see what might be coming next.

Thermal Air Conditioning

Many people are looking for ways to reduce their impact on the environment, but it’s tough to find an HVAC system that can deliver in terms of comfort while reducing energy waste. Enter thermally-driven air conditioning. This option is being developed by an Australian company called Chromasun and isn’t widely available yet. It probably won’t become commonplace for several years, but it’s worth considering when it does become available.

Thermally-driven air conditioning uses solar energy to cool down the air within a building. It is supplemented by natural gas as needed, offering a more efficient system that doesn’t skimp on effectiveness.

Ice-Powered Air Conditioning

Another eco-friendly option is ice-powered air conditioning, which is being developed by a company in California. The company calls its system the "Ice Bear," which freezes water in a tank overnight, and then uses that ice to cool down the air in a building the following day. At this point, the ice can provide cooling for about six hours, at which point a standard central air conditioner would have to take over.

Sensor-Based Ventilation

With this innovative new concept, sensor-based vents replace the standard vents throughout a home or office building. Those vents can monitor the air pressure, temperature, and other factors that impact indoor air quality. You can control the system with an app on your smartphone or allow it to make automatic adjustments based on the findings of the sensors. Sensor-based ventilation has been well-received in testing and initial installation.

Learn more about the latest innovations in HVAC from One Source Heating & Cooling by calling 205-209-4246.

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